Topics & Formats

Subscribers receive access to the topics below as well as live CE webinars conducted throughout the year.

Coming Soon

Live Webinar - Innovations in Training: Pharmacy Technician Residency Program
May 11, 2017 12-1 p.m. ET

Karen V. Youmbi, Pharm.D., BCPS
Manager, Pharmacy Regulatory Surveillance
Cedars-Sinai Medical Center
Los Angeles, California

ACPE activity # 0204-0000-17-432-L04-T
1 hour (0.1 CEU)

With the evolving healthcare landscape, pharmacy technicians are increasingly needed in specialized roles to support initiatives aimed at improving patient outcomes. Adequate knowledge and skills along with effective training methods are required to undertake these advanced roles. This activity will describe the attributes needed for pharmacy technicians to be successful in advanced roles. Participants will learn about innovative training processes including a pharmacy technician residency program.

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this knowledge-based educational activity, participants will be able to: 

  • Define the attributes needed for pharmacy technicians in specialized roles.
  • Review current training methods for pharmacy technicians.
  • Describe a pharmacy technician residency program to train pharmacy technicians.

  • Webinar
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Automation/Technology

Medication Management Technology Briefing

Mark H. Siska, R.Ph., MBA/TM
Assistant Director Informatics and Technology
Pharmacy Services
Mayo Clinic
Rochester, Minnesota

ACPE activity #0204-0000-16-425-H04-T
1 hour (0.1 CEU)

This technology primer will describe common types of automation and technology available to assist throughout the inpatient and outpatient medication use process. Pharmacy technicians will learn the pros and cons of integrating automation and technology into the medication use process.  Faculty will also describe the importance of human factors engineering when designing and implementing automation and technology processes.

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this knowledge-based educational activity, participants will be able to

  • List the types of automation and technology available to assist throughout the inpatient and outpatient medication use process.
  • Discuss the pros and cons of automation and technology integration into the medication use process.
  • Identify the importance of human factors engineering when designing and implementing automation and technology.
  • Podcast
  • On-Demand
  • CE Monograph
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Telepharmacy: An Emerging Pharmacy Practice Method

Emily Alexander, Pharm.D., BCPS, FASHP
Surveyor, Telehealth Pharmacy Practice
Center for Pharmacy Practice Accreditation
Madison, Wisconsin

ACPE Activity# 0204-0000-17-423-H05-T
1 hour (0.1 CEU)

Spurred by the technological revolution and its impact on healthcare, the telehealth industry is growing exponentially. The increasing use of telepharmacy in the delivery of pharmacy products and services to patients is changing practice models. This educational activity is designed to explore telepharmacy trends and how they affect pharmacy practice, including current and future telepharmacy models, emerging technician roles and activities, and obstacles that slow adoption of telepharmacy. Learners will also have the opportunity to hear about telepharmacy advantages and disadvantages, legal considerations, and regulatory trends.

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this knowledge-based continuing education activity, participants should be able to:

  • Describe examples of telepharmacy practice models currently in use.
  • Evaluate differences in telepharmacy and traditional pharmacy practice models, and how pharmacy technician roles may be affected.
  • Review three possible legal/regulatory considerations involved in telepharmacy practice.
  • On-Demand
  • CE Monograph
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Understanding the “Ins” of Informatics Interoperability
Chris Urbanski, B.S.Pharm., M.S., FASHP
Director, Core Clinical Applications
Information Services
Indiana University Health
Indianapolis, Indiana

ACPE activity # 0204-0000-16-462-H04-T
1 hour (0.1 CEU)

Pharmacy technicians are increasingly called upon to assist with pharmacy informatics. Understanding the differences between integrated and interfaced systems and how they work to promote interoperability are key to learning how to decipher the world of informatics. The program will conclude with application of interoperable systems and how they can impact workflow and patient safety at the bedside.

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this knowledge-based educational activity, participants will be able to
• Explain the difference between integrated and interfaced systems.
• Define and discuss types of interoperability.
• Define the role of pharmacy technicians with informatics and interoperability.
  • On-Demand
  • CE Monograph
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Acute/Critical Care

Competing Priorities: When Every Minute Counts

Kimberly Snodgrass, Pharm.D., BCPS
Pharmacy Supervisor
Cedars-Sinai Medical Center
Los Angeles, California
Tram Cat, Pharm.D., BCPS
Pharmacy Supervisor
Cedars-Sinai Medical Center
Los Angeles, California

ACPE activity # 0204-0000-14-478-H01-T
1 hour (0.1 CEU)

Emergency patient care situations arise on a regular basis in an acute hospital setting. Many of these situations will require stat delivery of medications. This activity provides case-based discussions of patient scenarios in which critical medications may be needed in a rapid turnaround time. Technicians will gain background knowledge about critical medications to provide a clinical context for requests for stat preparation and delivery of medications in an inpatient healthcare environment.

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this knowledge-based continuing education activity, participants should be able to

  • Identify potential barriers to rapid preparation and delivery of critical medications
  • Describe the rationale for stat preparation and delivery of critical medications
  • Explain clinical scenarios in which critical medications might be needed
  • Podcast
  • On-Demand
  • CE Monograph
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Rx Stat: Critical Care Essentials for the Pharmacy Technician

Jodi Dreiling, Pharm.D., BCPS, BCCCP
Critical Care Pharmacotherapy Specialist
PGY-2 Critical Care Residency Director
Cleveland Clinic Akron General
Akron, Ohio

ACPE activity # 0204-0000-16-450-H01-T
1 hour (0.1 CEU)

This activity will provide pharmacy technicians with a review of the most commonly-used medications in a critical care setting. Participants will learn basic concepts of critical care disease states and medications that are used in a critical care setting. Faculty will review patient care activities that may be provided by a pharmacy technician and how to prioritize those activities. Medical calculations that are commonly used in a critical care setting will be reviewed.

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this knowledge-based educational activity, participants will be able to

  • Discuss disease states that may require rapid medication delivery.
  • Describe the importance of stat medications needed to optimize patient care.
  • Demonstrate how to prioritize patient care activities.
  • List the appropriate math calculations used to deliver critical care medications.
  • On-Demand
  • CE Monograph
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Tenets for Safe Delivery of Parenteral Nutrition

Phil Ayers, Pharm.D., BCNSP, FASHP
Chief, Clinical Pharmacy Services
Baptist Health Systems
Clinical Associate Professor
University of Mississippi School of Pharmacy
Jackson, Mississippi

ACPE activity # 0204-0000-15-444-H01-T
1 hour (0.1 CEU)

This activity will provide pharmacy technicians with foundational principles for safe and efficacious use of parenteral nutrition. Participants will learn basic concepts regarding appropriate indications and methods for determining optimal macronutrients and micronutrients in parenteral nutrition patients. Recently published guidelines and recommendations to ensure safe delivery of parenteral nutrition will be highlighted.

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this knowledge-based educational activity, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss appropriate indications for optimal use of parenteral nutrition.
  • Explain methods to determine protein, caloric, and electrolyte needs for patients receiving parenteral nutrition. 
  • Review recent guidelines and recommendations to ensure safe delivery of parenteral nutrition.
  • On-Demand
  • CE Monograph
The Role of Barcoding Across the Medication Use Process

Tina M. Suess, M.H.A., B.S.N., RN-BC, CPHIMS
Manager, Medication Safety Integration
Lancaster General Health
Lancaster, Pennsylvania

ACPE activity # 0204-0000-14-476-H04-T
1 hour (0.1 CEU)

Barcodes have become mainstay from grocery store checkouts to tracking mail packages. Barcodes also play a role in the medication use process to drive medication safety and quality efforts. This presentation will discuss the history of barcodes in the medication use process and showcase various pharmacy workflows that incorporate barcode scanning to promote medication safety.

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this knowledge-based continuing education activity, participants should be able to

  • Identify the stages of the medication use process.
  • Describe the types of barcoding and technology solutions in the medication use process.
  • Describe safety and quality benefits that are gained from barcoding at various stages in the medication use process.
  • Podcast
  • On-Demand
  • CE Monograph
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Compounding Sterile Preparations

Aseptic Technique and Sterile Compounding Procedures: Focus on the Basics

Angela T. Cassano, Pharm.D., BCPS, FASHP
President, Pharmfusion Consulting, LLC
Midlothian, Virginia

ACPE activity #0204-0000-16-424-H04-T
1 hour (0.1 CEU)

Aseptic technique is critical to patient safety and all personnel involved with sterile compounding should be aware of the proper processes and procedures.  This activity focuses on the basics of garbing, handwashing, cleaning of work areas, as well as identification of critical sites and causes of contamination. Pharmacy technicians will learn about common items used in sterile compounding and how to respect the elements of aseptic technique to keep our patients safe.

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this knowledge-based educational activity, participants will be able to

  • Describe aseptic technique for preparing compounded sterile products (CSPs).
  • Explain proper procedures for hand washing, garbing, and cleaning work spaces.
  • Podcast
  • On-Demand
  • CE Monograph
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Extemporaneous Compounding of Nonsterile Preparations, Part I

J. Tyler Stevens, Pharm.D.
Assistant Professor
School of Pharmacy
Virginia Commonwealth University
Richmond, Virginia

ACPE activity # 0204-0000-16-455-H04-T
1 hour (0.1 CEU)

Patients regularly rely on the pharmacy team to compound dosage forms that are not commercially available. Whether it is an ointment, cream, solution, or another non-sterile formulation, compounding provides options for patients needing specialized doses or dosage forms to receive therapy. One common conundrum solved by compounding is the provision of a liquid formulation of a medication made from a tablet or capsule for a pediatric patient who can’t swallow solid dosage forms.

This program will focus on providing guidance for pharmacy technicians involved in non-sterile compounding in a variety of pharmacy practice settings. To provide compounded medications, the pharmacy team must have a solid understanding of the processes, procedures and equipment needed to prepare these formulations. Knowledge of calculations and how to apply them to compounding help to ensure correct proportions are used to make the final product. A highlight of the program will be the inclusion of practical examples that may be encountered in the pharmacy.

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this knowledge-based educational activity, participants should be able to

  • Discuss the history of extemporaneous compounding and review the role of USP 795.
  • Identify at least three pieces of compounding equipment and explain their uses.
  • Compare various pharmaceutical dosage forms and summarize proper techniques for compounding these nonsterile products.
  • Perform appropriate calculations necessary for compounding nonsterile products.
  • On-Demand
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Extemporaneous Compounding of Nonsterile Preparations, Part II

J. Tyler Stevens, Pharm.D.
Assistant Professor
School of Pharmacy
Virginia Commonwealth University
Richmond, Virginia

ACPE activity # 0204-0000-15-442-H04-T
1 hour (0.1 CEU)

This continuing education activity will highlight techniques and skills pharmacy technicians need to prepare various dosage forms which are not commercially-available to the patient. Part II of this series focuses on preparing divided (mixed) powders and capsules. Both pharmacists and pharmacy technicians must apply accurate calculations, methods, and procedures to ensure a safe and effective final product. Practical examples that may be encountered in the pharmacy will be highlighted.

Learning Objectives

  • Summarize the standards for compounding in USP Chapter <795>.
  • Compare various pharmaceutical dosage forms (divided powders and capsules) and summarize proper techniques for compounding these nonsterile products.
  • Explain appropriate packaging and labeling for each of the nonsterile products discussed.
  • Apply appropriate calculations necessary for compounding nonsterile products.
  • On-Demand
  • CE Monograph
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The Facts About High Risk Compounding

Eric S. Kastango, M.B.A., B.S.Pharm., FASHP
President/CEO
Clinical IQ, LLC
Madison, New Jersey

ACPE activity #0204-0000-16-453-H04-T
1 hour (0.1 CEU)

Pharmacy technicians are an integral part of the sterile compounding process and are regularly responsible for preparation of compounded sterile products (CSPs). High risk compounded sterile products (CSPs) are often made from non-sterile components and require sterilization prior to administration to patients. According to USP Chapter <797> standards, additional quality assurance processes are required for compounding environments, procedures, and personnel involved in preparing high risk CSPs. Sterilization techniques and sterility testing requirements are complex procedures and require proper training and competency assessment.

Learning Objectives
After participating in this knowledge-based educational activity, participants should be able to

  • Describe USP Chapter <797> standards for high risk level compounding.
  • Explain the elements of the quality assurance requirements for high risk compounding including components, procedures, facility requirements, personnel requirements and qualifications.
  • Differentiate between the types of sterilization methods.
  • Describe quality release testing of high risk level CSPs.
  • Podcast
  • On-Demand
  • CE Monograph
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Diabetes/Endocrine

Insulin Therapy: The Long and Short of It

Brooke Hudspeth, Pharm.D., CDE
Clinical Diabetes Care Pharmacist
Kroger Pharmacy
Assistant Professor
University of Kentucky College of Pharmacy
Lexington, Kentucky

ACPE activity # 0204-0000-14-475-H04-T
1 hour (0.1 CEU)

This activity will provide an overview of insulin use to manage hyperglycemia in a variety of practice settings. The most important and most common issues related to insulin therapy will be highlighted. Pharmacy technicians will learn a solid foundation of knowledge about insulin therapy to assist pharmacists with delivering safe and effective care to diabetes patients within their practice setting

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this knowledge-based continuing education activity, participants should be able to

  • Describe insulin’s role in the management of hyperglycemia in a variety of patient populations.
  • Describe the different types of insulin, including time-action profiles.
  • Summarize frequently asked questions from patients about insulin and insulin administration.
  • Podcast
  • On-Demand
  • CE Monograph
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Patient Safety

A Balancing Act: Managing Pain and Preventing Medication Misuse

Nina Cimino, Pharm.D.
Baltimore, Maryland

ACPE activity # 0204-0000-14-455-H05-T
1 hour (0.1 CEU, no partial credit)

This activity will provide an overview of medications used in pain management, with a focus on promoting safety. The role of different classes of pain medications and their adverse effects will be discussed. Principles for the safe use of pain medications and risk mitigation strategies will also be reviewed.

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this knowledge-based educational activity, participants will be able to

  • Identify and describe three different types of drugs used for pain management, including non-opioids, opioids, and adjuvant medications.
  • Describe abuse deterrent features of pain medications and identify medications containing these features.
  • Identify at least three risk factors for opioid misuse.
  • Describe strategies technicians can use to help pharmacists mitigate the risks of opioid therapy in pain management.
  • Podcast
  • On-Demand
  • CE Monograph
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Key Strategies for Improving Medication Safety: An ISMP Perspective for 2015

Michael R. Cohen, R.Ph., M.S., FASHP
President
Institute for Safe Medication Practices

Darryl S. Rich, Pharm.D., M.B.A., FASHP
Medication Safety Specialist
Institute for Safe Medication Practices

Christina Michalek, B.Sc.Pharm, FASHP
Medication Safety Specialist
Insitute for Safe Medication Practices

ACPE activity # 0204-0000-15-274-H05-T
2 hours (0.2 CEU)

This activity will provide an overview of the most important medication safety issues reported to ISMP in 2015. Pharmacy technicians will also learn about effective strategies to reduce medication errors related to sterile compounding, the ISMP Guidelines for the Safe Preparation of Sterile Compounds, and key elements of the new ISMP guidelines related to IV push administration of medications.

Learning Objectives

  • List the top five most important medication safety issues reported to ISMP in the past 12 months.
  • Describe the most implemented, and least implemented best practices from the 2014-15 ISMP Targeted Medication Safety Best Practices in Hospitals, and the new best practices for 2016-17 ISMP Targeted Medication Safety Best Practices in Hospitals.
  • Describe at least three effective strategies to reduce medication errors related to sterile compounding.
  • Describe the changes to the ISMP Guidelines for the Safe Preparation of Sterile Compounds and key elements of the new ISMP guidelines related to IV push administration of medications.
  • On-Demand
  • CE Monograph
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Medication Errors: Causes and Prevention

John B. Hertig, Pharm.D., M.S.
Associate Director and Assistant Clinical Professor
Purdue University College of Pharmacy's Center for Medication Safety Advancement
Indianapolis, Indiana

ACPE activity # 0204-0000-16-428-H05-T
1 hour (0.1 CEU)

Preventing medication errors requires a team approach in health care.  This activity will review the types and causes of medication errors throughout the medication use system.   Pharmacy technicians will learn strategies for preventing common medication errors, as well as processes for reporting medication errors including when, what, and to whom to report.

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this knowledge-based educational activity, participants will be able to

  • Describe common types of medication errors and identify factors that contribute to these errors.
  • Explain strategies for preventing common medication errors.
  • Outline processes and procedures for reporting medication errors, including when and what to report, and to whom should reporting occur.
  • Podcast
  • On-Demand
  • CE Monograph
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Pharmacy Technician’s Role in Pediatric Medication Safety

Sheila Pedigo, Pharm.D., BCPS
Pediatric Clinical Specialist
Virginia Commonwealth University Medical Center
Richmond, Virginia

ACPE activity #0204-0000-16-440-H05-T
1 hour (0.1 CEU)

Preparing medications for pediatric patients is more complicated than preparing medications for adults.  Doses usually must be calculated and most medications are not available in required doses. In addition, pediatric patients vary greatly in size and weight. This educational activity will identify the ages and drugs most associated with medication errors.  Additionally, faculty will review reasons that children are predisposed to medication errors and describe technology systems which minimize medication errors.  Strategies that pharmacy technicians should implement in their practice to enhance pediatric medication safety will be highlighted.

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this knowledge-based educational activity, participants will be able to

  • Identify pediatric ages and drugs associated with medication errors.
  • Describe reasons children are predisposed to medication errors.
  • List pharmacy technology systems which minimize medication errors. 
  • List strategies technicians should implement to enhance pediatric medication safety.
  • Podcast
  • On-Demand
  • CE Monograph
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Preventing Errors Associated with High-Alert Medications

Donna Horn, B.S.Pharm., D.Ph.
Director, Patient Safety - Community Pharmacy
Institute for Safe Medication Practices
Horsham, Pennsylvania

ACPE activity #0204-0000-16-430-H05-T
1 hour (0.1 CEU)

This activity will review the history and frequency of medication errors, using case examples of reported errors from high-alert medications. Pharmacy technicians will learn about high-alert medications in both the acute care and ambulatory care practice settings, as well as best practices for preventing errors associated with these medications.

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this knowledge-based educational activity, participants will be able to

  • Review the history and frequency of medication errors.
  • Discuss the multi-factorial nature of medication errors.
  • Cite examples of errors that occur with high-alert medications
  • Identify recommendations to prevent errors associated with high-alert medications
  • Podcast
  • On-Demand
  • CE Monograph
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Safe Medication Practices in an Aging Population

Michelle Fritsch, Pharm.D., CGP, BCACP
President
Meds MASH, LLC
Monkton, Maryland

ACPE activity # 0204-0000-16-418-H05-T
1 hour (0.1 CEU)

The population is aging with the largest generation now nearing or over age 65. Medication regimens can be especially complex for this patient population. For elderly patients, medications are often involved in the event that takes patients from being completely active and autonomous to needing regular care. Learn about the most common medications to monitor and how to protect patients from medication-related events.

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this knowledge-based educational activity, participants will be able to

  • Describe how medications impact senior adults differently than younger counterparts.
  • Explain the common medications contributing to falls, negative cardiovascular events, strokes, and other life-altering events.
  • Describe why medication regimens are often complicated and strategies to reduce risks of complex regimens.
  • On-Demand
  • CE Monograph
The Great Safety Debate

ACPE activity # 0204-0000-16-441-H05-T
1.5 hours (0.1.5 CEU)

See history unfold at the first Great Safety Debate. During this live broadcast from the ASHP Summer Meetings in Baltimore, specialists from across the country will meet on stage for a lively debate of top safety concerns moderated by Sean Cudahy, NBC News Charlottesville.

Learning Objectives

  • Compare and contrast the best practices with Insulin safety: Pen vs. vial.
  • Distinguish the risk/benefit of Independent Double Checks: Pro or Con as a safety measure.
  • Determine if TALL man lettering is a help or hindrance.

Moderator:

  • Sean Cudahy, B.A. Reporter & Anchor, WVIR TV NBC29, Charlottesville, Virginia, Herndon, Virginia

Panelists:

  • Gregory P. Burger, Pharm.D., CPPS Medication Safety Coordinator, Stormont-Vail Health, Lecompton, Kansas
  • Rosemary Call, Pharm.D., BCPS Medication Safety Officer, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland
  • Michael Cohen, R.Ph., M.S., Sc.D. (hon), DPS (hon), FASHP President, Institute for Safe Medication Practices, Horsham, Pennsylvania
  • Michael C. Dejos, Pharm.D., BCPS Medication Safety Officer, Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children, Wilmington, Delaware
  • Natasha Nicol, Pharm.D., FASHP Director of Global Patient Safety Affairs, Cardinal Health, Pawleys Island, South Carolina
  • Christopher M. Patty, D.N.P., RN, CPPS Medication Safety Specialist, Kaweah Delta Health Care District, Visalia, California
  • Nancy Rampe, Pharm.D. Pharmacy Manager, St. Rita's Medical Center, Kalida, Ohio
  • Meghan M. Rowcliffe, Pharm.D., BCPS Pediatric Medication Safety Officer, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD, Hanover, Maryland
  • Linda M. Spooner, Pharm.D., BCPS (AQ-ID), FASHP Professor of Pharmacy Practice, MCPHS University School of Pharmacy-Worcester/Manchester, Worcester, Massachusetts
  • On-Demand
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The Joint Commission is Coming! What Do I Do?

Jeannell Mansur, Pharm.D., FASHP, FMSMO, CJCP
Practice Leader, Medication Safety
Joint Commission Resources
Joint Commission International
Oak Brook, Illinois

ACPE activity #0204-0000-15-416-H03-T
1 hour (0.1 CEU)

A successful survey by the Joint Commission is a goal for all healthcare organizations who use this process for accreditation by the Joint Commission and/or certification by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). Founded in 1951, The Joint Commission evaluates and accredits more than 20,500 health care organizations and programs in the United States. To earn and maintain The Joint Commission’s Gold Seal of Approval™, an organization undergoes an on-site survey by a Joint Commission survey team at least every three years. This presentation will describe the purpose of the Joint Commission survey, how organizations will prepare for survey and what role the pharmacy technician may play, as well as what happens during the survey and how the pharmacy technician may be involved.

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this knowledge-based educational activity, participants will be able to

  • Describe the purpose of the accreditation process and the implications of failure to meet Joint Commission standards.
  • List three areas in which the pharmacy technician may assist the healthcare organization in its preparation for survey.
  • Identify three common medication-related findings during Joint Commission surveys.
  • Podcast
  • On-Demand
  • CE Monograph
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Pharmacotherapy

Anticoagulation—a Changing Landscape

James B. Groce, III, Pharm.D., CACP
Professor, Department of Pharmacy Practice
Campbell University College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences
Clinical Assistant Professor of Medicine
University of North Carolina School of Medicine
Clinical Pharmacy Specialist

ACPE activity # 0204-0000-16-457-H01-T
1 hour (0.1 CEU)

Pharmacy technicians, as part of the pharmacy team caring for patients on anticoagulation therapy, face a challenging role because there is a delicate balance between maintaining appropriate levels of anticoagulation and minimizing the potential risks associated with therapy. Pharmacy technicians must stay up-to-date as new information emerges that impacts how they participate upon the pharmacy team providing care for patients. Common anticoagulation challenges will be addressed and emerging information in this area of practice will be shared. Patient case discussions will provide pharmacy technicians with strategies for how to best work with the pharmacy team caring for patients on anticoagulation therapy.

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this knowledge-based educational activity, participants will be able to

  • List traditional and emerging anticoagulant therapies.
  • Compare differences between traditional and emerging anticoagulants.
  • Identify the current challenges in clinical practice related to anticoagulation therapy.
  • Describe the role of the pharmacy technician in supporting patients receiving anticoagulation therapy.
  • On-Demand
  • CE Monograph
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New Drugs Update 2014

Melanie W. Pound, Pharm.D., BCPS
Associate Professor of Pharmacy Practice
Campbell University College of Pharmacy & Health Sciences
Buies Creek, North Carolina

ACPE activity #0204-0000-14-710-H04-T
1 hour (0.1 CEU)

This activity will describe the new FDA-approved medications for 2014. Faculty will review the following prescription medications in terms of approved indications and pharmacology: diabetes medications-dapagliflozin, empagliflozin, albiglutide; antibiotics-dalbavancin, oritavancin, tedizolid; cardiovascular medication-vorapaxar and the COPD medication, olodaterol. In addition, common adverse effects and drug interactions will be discussed for the prescription products.

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this knowledge-based educational activity, participants will be able to

  • Identify the FDA-approved medications for 2014.
  • Explain the indications and pharmacology of the following prescription products: dapagliflozin, empagliflozin, albiglutide, dalbavancin, oritavancin, tedizolid, vorapaxar and olodaterol.
  • Describe the common adverse events and drug interactions associated with the new medications.
  • Podcast
  • On-Demand
  • CE Monograph
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New Drugs Update 2015

Melanie W. Pound, Pharm.D., BCPS
Wilmington, North Carolina

ACPE activity # 0204-0000-14-456-H04-T
1 hour (0.1 CEU, no partial credit)

This activity will describe the new FDA-approved medications for 2015. Faculty will review the following prescription medications in terms of approved indications, pharmacology, common adverse effects and drug interactions: antimicrobials-ceftazidime/avibactam and isavuconazonium; cardiovascular medications-alirocumab, edoxaban, ivabradine, and sacubitril/valsartan; and an adjunctive therapy for depression, brexpiprazole. In addition, a significant new dosage form of insulin glargine (U-300) will be discussed briefly.

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this knowledge-based educational activity, participants will be able to

  • Identify the FDA-approved medications for 2015.
  • Explain the indications and pharmacology of the following prescription products: alirocumab, brexpiprazole, ceftazidime/avibactam, edoxaban, isavuconazonium, ivabradine, and sacubitril/valsartan.
  • Describe common adverse events and drug interactions associated with selected FDA-approved medications for 2015.
  • Compare and contrast insulin glargine U-300 and standard insulin glargine.

  • On-Demand
  • CE Monograph
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New Drugs Update 2016

Melanie W. Pound, Pharm.D., BCPS
Associate Professor of Pharmacy Practice
Campbell University College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences
New Hanover Regional Medical Center
Wilmington, North Carolina

ACPE activity # 0204-0000-16-464-H01-T
1 hour (0.1 CEU)

This activity will describe the new FDA-approved medications for 2016. Faculty will review the following prescription medications in terms of approved indications and pharmacology: lixisenatide, brivaracetam, pimavanserin, reslizumab, daclizumab, lifitegrast and two combination hepatitis C medications, sofosbuvir/velpatasvir and elbasvir/grazoprevir. In addition, common adverse effects and drug interactions will be discussed for these selected prescription products as well as important counseling tips for patients.

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this knowledge-based educational activity, participants will be able to

  • Identify the FDA-approved medications for 2016.
  • Explain the indications and pharmacology of the following prescription products: lixisenatide, brivaracetam, pimavanserin, reslizumab, daclizumab, lifitegrast and two combination hepatitis C medications, sofosbuvir/velpatasvir and elbasvir/grazoprevir.
  • Describe common adverse events and drug interactions associated with these selected FDA-approved medications for 2016.
  • On-Demand
  • CE Monograph
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Overview of Critical OTC and Self-Care Issues – A Primer for Pharmacy Technicians

Daniel Krinsky, M.S., B.S.Pharm.
Associate Professor Department of Pharmacy Practice
Northeast Ohio Medical University College of Pharmacy
Manager, MTM Services
Giant Eagle Pharmacy
Ravenna, Ohio

ACPE activity #0204-0000-14-480-H01-T
1 hour (0.1 CEU)

This presentation will review key information about commonly used OTC products, the types of questions technicians should be asking consumers/patients, information to document about OTCs during the medication reconciliation process, and various safety concerns regarding these products.

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this knowledge-based educational activity, participants will be able to

  • Describe the pharmacy technician's role in patient care regarding OTC management
  • Explain the importance of identifying OTC product use during the process of medication reconciliation
  • Identify key safety concerns associated with certain OTC products
  • Podcast
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Pharmacy Operations

Asking the Right Questions: A Practical Approach to Dietary Supplements

Candy Tsourounis, Pharm.D., FCSHP
Professor of Clinical Pharmacy
Medication Outcomes Center
Department of Clinical Pharmacy
University of California at San Francisco, School of Pharmacy
San Francisco, California


ACPE activity # 0204-0000-17-424-H01-T

1 hour (0.1 CEU)

Dietary supplements are widely used by patients in the United States; however, usage is frequently not disclosed during medication histories. Pharmacy technicians play a critical role in taking medication histories and performing medication reconciliation and therefore must be aware of the most commonly used dietary supplements. This program will focus on practical considerations for dietary supplements, and provide a resource for pharmacy technicians to turn to when assisting with medication histories.

Learning Objectives

  • List three ways dietary supplements are regulated differently than prescription medicines and over-the-counter medicines,
  • For each dietary supplement reviewed, list the most common use, dosage and safety information.
  • Provide three examples of how to elicit a complete dietary supplement medication history.

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A Technician's Guide to Pharmaceutical Calculations: Dosing and Dispensing Math and Compounding Calculations

Joy E. Sakai, Pharm.D.
Lead Clinical Pharmacist
Kaweah Delta Health Care District
College of the Sequoias Pharmacy Technician Program
Partner
RX Consultants
Visalia, California

ACPE activity #0204-0000-16-439-H04-T
1 hour (0.1 CEU)

In the workplace, pharmacy technicians perform pharmaceutical calculations on a daily basis.  Performing these calculations accurately is vital to patient safety.  Using a practical case-based approach, faculty will discuss dosing and dispensing math and compounding calculations.

This activity will address critical calculation situations such as calculating medication quantities for reconstituting oral preparations and volume of doses required to prepare injectable dosages.  Also addressed will be determining the percent strength of a product when two volumes of given strengths are combined and converting a given doses to required volume of solution or number of tablets.

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this knowledge-based educational activity, participants will be able to

  • Identify the volume of diluent and the volume displaced by a drug in a reconstitution problem.
  • Calculate volume of doses required for preparing injectable dosages.
  • Round a calculated dose, as appropriate, to accurately weigh or measure a medication.
  • Find the percent strength of a product when two volumes of given strengths are combined.
  • Calculate the volume required to deliver a given dose of drug in solution or number of tablets.
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A Technician's Guide to Practical Dosage Calculations: The Safe Use of Conversions and Dosing Equations

Joy E. Sakai, Pharm.D.
Lead Clinical Pharmacist
Kaweah Delta Health Care District
College of the Sequoias Pharmacy Technician Program
Partner
RX Consultants
Visalia, California

ACPE activity #0204-0000-16-437-H04-T
1 hour (0.1 CEU)

Accurately performing pharmaceutical calculations is an important part of every pharmacy technician’s job. This educational activity will address the most frequent causes of calculation errors and provide a strategy to prevent these errors from occurring.  Using a practical case-based approach, faculty will discuss calculations that pharmacy technicians encounter on the job and also discuss the correct approach to problem solving.

The activity will address using ratios to convert between metric units, calculate a volume of a liquid medication, and convert between dosage measurements from the household system of measurement to the metric system.  Also discussed will be calculating doses based on body surface area and calculating quantity of medications to dispense when a specific duration of therapy is provided in the prescription.

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this knowledge-based educational activity, participants will be able to

  • List two of the most frequent causes of calculation errors and a strategy to prevent these errors.
  • Convert between metric units when interpreting a prescription or drug order.
  • Calculate the volume required to deliver a specific dose of a liquid drug.
  • Convert dosage measurements from the household system of measurement to the metric system and vice versa.
  • Calculate doses based on body weight and body surface area.
  • Calculate the quantity of medication to be dispensed when given a defined duration for the prescription.
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A Toolkit for Pharmacy – Managing Prior Authorizations Operations

Donald Carroll, B.S. Pharm, M.H.A.
Senior Director
Specialty and Ambulatory Pharmacy
Cleveland Clinic
Cleveland, Ohio

Sarah Hudson-Disalle, Pharm.D.
Pharmacy Manager
The Wexner Medical Center at the Ohio State University
Columbus, Ohio

Niesha L. Griffith, M.S., FASHP

Vice President, Cancer Services
West Virginia University Health System
Morgantown, West Virginia

ACPE activity # 0204-0000-16-241-H04-T
1 hour (0.1 CEU)

During this activity, technicians will learn about necessary steps to implement or improve a prior authorization program, including processes for overcoming a denial or rejection. Strategies for training technical and clinical staff to perform or support prior authorizations will be highlighted.

  • Describe the steps necessary to implement or improve a prior authorization program.
  • Apply strategies for training technical and clinical staff to perform or support prior authorizations.
  • Develop processes for overcoming a denial or rejection.

 

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Best Practices for Inventory Control

Rebecca B. Brewer, CPhT
Supply POC
Naval Health Clinic Charleston
Goose Creek, South Carolina

ACPE activity #0204-0000-16-432-H04-T
1 hour (0.1 CEU)

This activity will describe the pharmacy inventory process, highlighting key aspects of storage and handling that must be considered when working with medications. Best practices for proper disposal of all types of medications and pharmaceutical waste will be described. Faculty will analyze variables in the pharmacy inventory process that may lead to drug shortages and describe strategies for alerting other stakeholders of an impending or current drug shortage. Pharmacy technicians will also learn key inventory concepts and terminology such as par levels, turns, cost of goods and others.

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this knowledge-based educational activity, participants will be able to

  • Describe the pharmacy inventory process and highlight key aspects of storage and handling that must be considered when working with medications.
  • Outline best practices for proper disposal of all types of medications and pharmaceutical waste.
  • Analyze variables in the pharmacy inventory process that may lead to drug shortages and how to alert other stakeholders of an impending or current drug shortage. 
  • Explain key inventory concepts and terminology, such as par levels, turns and cost of goods.
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Improving Performance on Bundled Payment Initiatives: Pharmacy’s Role on the Interdisciplinary Team

Live from The Midyear!

Cynthia Williams, B.S.Pharm., FASHP
Vice President and Chief Pharmacy Officer
Riverside Health System
Newport News, Virginia

ACPE activity # 0204-0000-16-286-H04-T
1 hour (0.1 CEU)

This activity will provide an overview of the core components of the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) bundled payment initiative. Learn about opportunities for pharmacy involvement to improve performance on bundled payment initiatives. Medication-related initiatives that have been shown to improve patient outcomes and lower costs in the area of bundled payment initiatives will be highlighted.

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this knowledge-based educational activity, participants will be able to

  • Describe the core components of the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) bundled payment initiative.
  • List three medication-related initiatives that have been shown to improve patient outcomes and lower costs in the area of bundled payment initiatives.
  • Evaluate three opportunities for pharmacy involvement within your organization to improve performance on bundled payment initiatives.

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Meeting the Challenge of Drug Shortages

Erin R. Fox, Pharm.D., FASHP
Director, Drug Information Service
University of Utah Hospitals and Clinics
Salt Lake City, Utah

ACPE activity #0204-0000-16-429-H04-T
1 hour (0.1 CEU)

This activity will outline the variables in the pharmacy inventory process that may lead to drug shortages from within and outside your organization. Expert faculty will explain effective supply chain management to decrease the severity of a drug shortage. Communication strategies for disseminating information to stakeholders, including patients, about impending or current drug shortages will also be described.

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this knowledge-based educational activity, participants will be able to

  • Analyze variables in the pharmacy inventory process that may lead to drug shortages from within and outside your organization
  • Explain effective supply chain management to decrease the severity of a drug shortage.
  • Outline communication strategies for disseminating information to stakeholders, including patients, about impending or current drug shortages. 
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Pharmacy Technicians: Pivotal to the Success of the Health-System Specialty Pharmacy

Michael DeCoske, Pharm.D., BCPS
Associate Chief Pharmacy Officer, Ambulatory Services
Duke University Hospital
Assistant Professor of Clinical Education
UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy
Durham, North Carolina

ACPE activity # 0204-0000-16-413-H04-T

This webinar will provide an overview of the emerging health-system specialty pharmacy landscape. An overview of typical health-system pharmacy operations and the diverse opportunities for pharmacy technicians will be highlighted. Focus will be given to the valuable role that technicians can play in improving patient care.

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this knowledge-based educational activity, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the value proposition for health-system specialty pharmacy.
  • List innovative roles for pharmacy technicians within health-system specialty pharmacy.
  • Explain how pharmacy technicians can positively impact patient outcomes and satisfaction.

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Safe Handling and Best Practices for Storage of Medication

Jennifer Murphy, Pharm.D., BCPS
University of California, Davis Medical Center
University of California, Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center
Sacramento, California

Jessica Turner, CPhT
Pharmacy Technician III - Investigational Drug Service
University of California, Davis Medical Center
University of California, Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center
Sacramento, California

ACPE #: 0204-0000-0204-0000-16-442-H04-T
1 hour (0.1 CEU)

Medication storage is a fundamental component of pharmacy operations from both a regulatory stand point and good clinical practice. Pharmacy technicians serve an essential role in ensuring that medications are stored properly. Components of medication storage include location, temperature monitoring and documentation. This activity will explore the different modalities of medication storage, including controlled temperature storage ranges, medication storage precautions, and understanding how to store hazardous medications. This activity will also cover some special considerations when storing vaccinations. Finally there will be a discussion on how expiration dates are defined.

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this knowledge-based continuing education activity, participants should be able to

  • List the different modalities of medication storage.
  • Describe various methods for temperature monitoring.
  • Identify controlled temperature storage ranges for different modalities.
  • Explain the most commonly utilized medication storage precautions.
  • Describe how to store hazardous medications.
  • On-Demand
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Safe Handling of Hazardous Drugs

Luci A. Power, B.S.Pharm, M.S.
Senior Pharmacy Consultant
Power Enterprises
San Francisco, California

ACPE activity #0204-0000-16-426-H04-T
1 hour (0.1 CEU)

This activity will assist technicians in identifying the risks of handling hazardous drugs. National guidelines and best practices for safe handling and storage of hazardous drugs will be outlined. Faculty will also review work processes that are unique to handling and preparing hazardous drugs with a special emphasis on the technician’s role in these processes.

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this knowledge-based educational activity, participants will be able to

  • Define hazardous drugs.
  • Explain and identify risks of handling hazardous drugs.  
  • Describe proper handling and storage of hazardous drugs.  
  • Outline work processes that are unique to handling and preparing hazardous drugs.
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Using LEAN Principles to Solve Pharmacy Operation Dilemmas

Rebecca Szymanski, Pharm.D., BCPS
Clinical Pharmacy Manager
PGY1 Residency Program Director
Carolinas Medical Center - NorthEast
Concord, North Carolina

Alison Walker, B.S., CPhT
Technical Services Manager, Pharmacy Services
Carolinas Medical Center - NorthEast
Concord, North Carolina

ACPE activity # 0204-0000-15-421-H04-T
1 hour (0.1 CEU)

Pharmacy operations demand that staff work quickly and accurately to meet the needs of customers. By using LEAN principles in pharmacy operations, staff can more readily meet the customer needs in a more efficient and logical manner that will reduce waste. This program will provide a primer on LEAN principles. Case studies will explore how LEAN applications may provide solutions to age old pharmacy operational dilemmas.

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this knowledge-based educational activity, participants will be able to

  • Define LEAN and its application to pharmacy.
  • Explain how waste is defined in LEAN terms.
  • Discuss problem-solving strategies involving LEAN methodology.
  • Identify opportunities in your own work environment where waste could be reduced by using LEAN principles.
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Pharmacy Law/Regulatory

Controlled Substances: Regulatory Overview and Strategies for Preventing Misuse and Diversion

Nina Cimino, Pharm.D.
Assistant Professor at University of Maryland School of Pharmacy
Baltimore, Maryland

ACPE activity # 0204-0000-15-443-H03-T
1 hour (0.1 CEU)

This activity will provide an overview of the laws and regulations governing the management of controlled substances in pharmacy practice. The process for utilizing controlled substances, including procurement, dispensing, and disposal will be covered. Strategies for preventing controlled substance misuse and diversion will also be described, with an emphasis on the role of pharmacy technicians in recognizing and preventing misuse and diversion.

Learning Objectives

  • List the key federal law governing controlled substance prescribing, dispensing, and distribution and describe its impact on pharmacy practice.
  • Describe the process of controlled substance procurement, dispensing, and disposal.
  • Given a patient case, identify strategies which can be used by pharmacy personnel to reduce controlled substance misuse and diversion.
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FDA Update 2015: Initiatives Impacting Today's Practice

Kimberly Chiu, Pharm.D.
Consumer Safety Officer, Division of Drug Information
U.S. Food and Drug Administration
Silver Spring, Maryland

Lena Choe, Pharm.D.
Team Leader, Division of Drug Information
U.S. Food and Drug Administration
Silver Spring, Maryland

ACPE activity # 0204-0000-15-225-H03-T
1 hour (0.1 CEU)

Join us for proceedings from the 2015 ASHP Midyear Clinical Meeting. This session will provide pharmacy technicians with an update on initiatives from the FDA including requirements of the Physician Labeling Rule (PLR) for prescription drug labeling and the Pregnancy and Lactation Labeling Rule (PLLR). FDA's proposed rule for Electronic Distribution of Prescribing Information for Human Prescription Drugs will also be highlighted.

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this knowledge-based educational activity, participants will be able to

  • Identify key content and format requirements of the “Physician Labeling Rule” for prescription drug labeling.
  • Describe the Pregnancy and Lactation Labeling Rule (PLLR).
  • Explain FDA’s proposed rule “Electronic Distribution of Prescribing Information for Human Prescription Drugs.”
  • Identify the potential impact of the PLLR and FDA’s proposed rule.
  • Describe other 2015 FDA initiatives.

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Implementation of the Affordable Care Act: The Role of Pharmacy in Healthcare Reform

Christopher J. Topoleski
Director, Federal Regulatory Affairs
The American Society of Health-System Pharmacists
Bethesda, Maryland

ACPE activity # 0204-0000-14-497-H03-T
1 hour (0.1 CEU)

The Affordable Care Act has brought about a number of changes in healthcare. Many of the programs enacted by the ACA impact pharmacy practice and bring about opportunities for enhanced delivery of care to patients. The pharmacy team is an integral part of implementation of healthcare reform programs. This presentation focuses specifically on the pharmacy technician’s role in moving healthcare forward in the United States.

Learning Objectives
After participating in this knowledge-based educational activity, participants should be able to

  • Explain the current health policy environment and the impetus for health care reform
  • Articulate the direction that the provision of healthcare is moving in the United States and the role of non-physician practitioners
  • Identify the various quality incentive and shared savings programs enacted by the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and be able to articulate the differences between them
  • Discuss opportunities for health care professionals, including technicians, to participate in the implementation of various health reform programs as enacted as part of the ACA
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Regulatory Affairs Overview

Al Carter, Pharm.D.
Director, Professional Affairs
Walgreen Company
Deerfield, Illinois

Karla M. Miller, Pharm.D., BCPP
Assistant Vice President
Pharmacy Services and Clinical Therapeutics
Hospital Corporation of America, Clinical Services Group
Nashville, Tennessee
Assistant Faculty
University of Tennessee
Memphis, Tennessee

ACPE activity # 0204-0000-16-434-H04-T
1 hour (0.1 CEU)

This regulatory update will describe in detail the oversight of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) as it relates to pharmacy practice. The roles of federal and state agencies will be outlined, including which entities have jurisdiction in specific situations.  Faculty will also clarify the documentation required by various regulatory agencies.

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this knowledge-based educational activity, participants will be able to

  • Define and explain each major federal and state regulatory agency and its impact on the practice of pharmacy.
  • Explain the jurisdiction granted to each regulatory agency and the existing overlap of federal and state jurisdictions.
  • Describe the documentation requirements for prescription records and retention requirements with many of the state and federal agencies.
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Regulatory Affairs: Regulatory Aspects of Sterile Compounding

Angela T. Cassano, Pharm.D., BCPS, FASHP
President
Pharmfusion Consulting, LLC
Midlothian, Virginia

ACPE activity # 0204-0000-16-438-H03-T
1 hour (0.1 CEU)

Expert faculty will review published guidelines and standards pertaining to compounded sterile products (CSPs) with a special emphasis on key sections of USP Chapter  797.  Pharmacy technicians will learn how to assist with regulatory compliance and patient safety.

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this knowledge-based educational activity, participants will be able to

  • Describe published guidelines and standards pertaining to compounded sterile products (CSPs). 
  • Explain key sections of USP Chapter <797>.
  • Identify areas of USP Chapter <797>  where pharmacy technicians can assist with regulatory compliance and patient safety.
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Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategies (REMS): Ensuring Access and Safe Use of Pharmaceuticals with Special Concerns

James M. Hoffman, Pharm.D., M.S., BCPS
Associate Member, Pharmaceutical Sciences
Medication Outcomes and Safety Officer
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital
Memphis, Tennessee

ACPE activity #0204-0000-13-440-H03-T
1 hour (0.1 CEU)

Risk evaluation and mitigation strategies (REMS) have become an established medication safety mechanism.  REMS can have a variety of components such as medication guides, communication plans, or elements to assure safe use. In some cases, REMS facilitate continued access to innovative medications with serious risks that otherwise would not be available. As REMS have become a common feature of the medication use process, it is important for pharmacy technicians to understand the rationale for the development of REMS and their potential components.

This educational activity is designed to educate pharmacy technicians about REMS for drugs dispensed by pharmacies in any practice setting.  By understanding specific requirements of approved REMS programs and the challenges they can present, pharmacy technicians can contribute to the successful implementation of REMS. Practical strategies pharmacy technicians can take to assist in managing REMS requirements will be described.

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this knowledge-based educational activity, participants will be able to

  • Define Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategies (REMS) and the rationale for their development.
  • Identify key features of REMS, including their structure, potential components, and the selection process.
  • Describe trends in the number of drugs with REMS requirements and how REMS have changed since they took effect in 2008.
  • Identify challenges and opportunities REMS present to pharmacies.
  • Explain practical approaches to proactively and effectively implement REMS, including the proper distribution of medication guides.
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USP <800>: Strategies for Compliance

Patricia C. Kienle, M.P.A., B.S.Pharm., FASHP
Director, Accreditation and Medication Safety
Cardinal Health Innovative Delivery Solutions
Laflin, Pennsylvania

Eric S. Kastango, B.S.Pharm, M.B.A., FASHP
President/CEO
Clinical IQ, LLC and CriticalPoint, LLC
Madison, New Jersey

ACPE activity # 0204-0000-15-131-H03-T
2 hours (0.2 CEU)

USP <800> Hazardous Drugs – Handling in Healthcare Settings has been published for public comment and is planned to be official (so, enforceable) in 2016. Though the chapter is based on public documents that have been in the literature since the 1980s, many organizations are not fully compliant with all the containment requirements. This session will summarize the requirements and assist the attendees in developing an Action Plan to prioritize aspects of USP <800>.

Learning Objectives

  • Identify the key hazardous drug containment strategies in USP <800>.
  • List the facility requirements for receipt, storage, compounding, transport, and administration of hazardous drugs required by USP <800>.
  • Describe the cleaning steps required to decontaminate hazardous drug areas.
  • Compare the requirements in USP <800> to OSHA, NIOSH, ASHP, and ONS standards and guidelines.
  • Develop an Action Plan to comply with USP <800> prior to the time it is enforceable.
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Professional Practice

"Investigating" the Role of Pharmacy Technicians in an Investigational Drug Service

Jennifer Murphy, Pharm.D., BCPS
Oncology and Investigational Drug Services Clinical Staff II Pharmacist
University of California Davis Medical Center
Sacramento, California

Jessica Turner, CPhT
Investigational Drug Services Clinical Pharmacy Technician III
University of California Davis Medical Center
Sacramento, California

ACPE activity # 0204-0000-15-414-H01-T
1 hour (0.1 CEU)

Conducting therapeutic clinical trials is a multidisciplinary effort. The Investigational Drug Service, operated by specialized pharmacy technicians and pharmacists, is responsible for maintaining drug supply and ensuring patients receive the investigational product in accordance with the study protocol. To accomplish this, expansion of technician roles to optimize the pharmacy workforce is essential. This activity will review the essential components of an Investigational Drug Services pharmacy, and discuss advanced technician roles and responsibilities in clinical trials. Participants will learn firsthand how these advanced roles have impacted the career of a specialized Investigational Drug Services technician.

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this knowledge-based educational activity, participants will be able to

  • Describe the drug development process and the role of an investigational drug service pharmacy in this process.
  • Identify the roles and responsibilities of the specialized pharmacy technician in the day to day operations of an Investigational Drug Services Pharmacy.
  • Describe areas in which pharmacist extenders can be utilized in setting up and managing clinical drug trials so pharmacists can dedicate more time to the clinical aspects of drug trials.
  • Describe a case example of how career advancement opportunities in Investigational Drug Services have impacted pharmacy workflow and patient care.
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Advanced Pharmacy Technician Roles: Focus on Specialized Training and Career Advancement Opportunities

Tricia L. Parker, Pharm.D., BCPS
Assistant Chief - Clinical Coordinator
UC Davis Medical Center - Inpatient Pharmacy Services
Associate Professor
UCD School of Medicine & UCSF School of Pharmacy
Sacramento, California

ACPE activity #0204-0000-14-701-H04-T
1 hour (0.1 CEU)

Ensuring all pharmacy team members perform to their full scope of practice will result in optimal drug therapy outcomes. To accomplish this, expansion of technician roles to optimize the pharmacy workforce is essential. This activity will discuss key opportunities for advanced pharmacy technician roles, and ways to develop competent technicians to deliver important elements of focused patient care by effective collaboration with pharmacists and various other members of the health-care team. Participants will learn firsthand how advanced training and opportunities have impacted the career of a specialized oncology technician.

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this knowledge-based educational activity, participants will be able to

  • Describe areas in which pharmacist extenders can be utilized to provide pharmacists more time to devote to clinical practice
  • Identify opportunities to support training and advancement for pharmacy technicians in the health-system setting.
  • Detail emerging opportunities for pharmacy technicians in today’s hospital/health-system practice setting.
  • Describe a case example of how career advancement opportunities for technicians have impacted pharmacy workflow and patient care.
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Dealing with Difficult People

Leslie A. Stein, B.S.
Coach
Full Circle Inspiration, Inc.
Las Vegas, Nevada

ACPE activity # 0204-0000-16-448-H04-T
1.5 hours (0.15 CEU)

Is there anything worse than dealing with someone you can’t stand? Whose behavior is so frustrating it actually makes you lose focus? Yet it seems organizations these days are filled with people who seem to make dysfunctional behavior a hobby.

This session will address some of the most common dysfunctional behaviors that happen in teams and provide new approaches (and a few oldies but goodies) for addressing them. Approaches will include both tools for use in the moment they happen and more strategic ways to keep them from happening again in the future.

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this knowledge-based educational activity, participants will be able to

  • Explain how exercises can help a team reveal its own problems to itself and open up dialogue about dysfunction and difficult behaviors.
  • Apply tactical tools and approaches to use in the moment when dysfunctional behavior rears its ugly head.
  • Choose a strategic approach to dealing with dysfunctional behavior that can prevent it in the future.


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Navigating Mobile Health for Pharmacy Technicians

Kevin A. Clauson, Pharm.D.
Associate Professor
Lipscomb University College of Pharmacy
Nashville, Tennessee

ACPE activity #0204-0000-14-700-H04-T
1 hour (0.1 CEU)

This pharmacy technician continuing education program will introduce participants to an exciting new area for pharmacy, mobile health. Mobile health, or mHealth, is the use of mobile devices and global networks to deliver health services and information. The mobile devices most commonly used are cell phones and tablets (e.g., iPad, Surface); however, these devices can also come in the form of wireless-enabled medicine vials and glucometers and smart pills and bottles. Many of these devices are patient-facing products and pharmacy technicians can serve a valuable role as navigators to help connect patients with these valuable tools. Relevant mobile applications, commonly called apps, will also be discussed in this program. As mHealth exists in a fluid environment, risks associated with these tools will also be reviewed.

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this knowledge-based continuing education activity, participants should be able to

  • Define core concepts and terminology related to mobile health (mHealth)
  • Identify opportunities for pharmacy within the mHealth arena
  • Delineate risks associated with the use of mHealth tools and technology
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Patient Assistance Programs: Technicians Impacting Access to Care

Hannah Peabody, CPhT
Hematology/Oncology Associates of CNY
East Syracuse, New York

ACPE Activity # 0204-0000-15-445-H04-T

1 hour (0.1 CEU)

Learning Objectives

  • Identify patients who are in need of financial assistance.
  • Describe the steps of locating and securing financial assistance for a patient.
  • Recognize the differences in securing financial assistance for commercially-insured versus government-funded patients.

 

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Tech-Check-Tech: Incorporating into Hospital Practice

Kelley Beaty, CPhT
Pharmacy Technician Supervisor
Baptist Memorial Hospital
Memphis, Tennessee

ACPE activity # 0204-0000-17-431-H03-T
1 hour (0.1 CEU)

As pharmacists’ roles continue to evolve, so do the roles of pharmacy technicians. One expanded role of pharmacy technicians is tech-check-tech which is allowed in some states under very specific rules. In this activity, faculty will explore tech-check-tech programs and share a case example of how one hospital has successfully implemented tech-check-tech.

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this knowledge-based educational activity, participants will be able to:

  • Compare and contrast the laws of tech-check-tech programs.
  • Describe strategies to implement a tech-check-tech program.
  • Outline the benefits of incorporating a tech-check-tech in a hospital setting.
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The Pharmacy Technician's Role in Improving Customer Service

Erin Melissa Ryman, B.S., CPhT
Program Director
Cleveland Clinic School of Pharmacy Technology
Training Coordinator
Cleveland Clinic Pharmacy
Cleveland, Ohio

ACPE activity #0204-0000-16-431-H04-T
1 hour (0.1 CEU)

This primer on customer service will assist pharmacy technicians in identifying all of the pharmacy stakeholders or customers, in addition to the patients we serve.  Faculty will describe practical tips for triaging incoming requests and concerns to improve customer service. Case studies for dealing with difficult customers will also be described.

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this knowledge-based educational activity, participants will be able to

  • Identify at least three pharmacy stakeholders or customers.
  • Describe ways to triage incoming requests and concerns.
  • Describe effective techniques for dealing with difficult customers.
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Understanding Intergenerational Differences in the Workplace

Lindsey Kelley, Pharm.D., M.S.
Assistant Director of Pharmacy, Ambulatory Care Services
University of Michigan Health System
Adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor
University of Michigan College of Pharmacy
Ann Arbor, Michigan

ACPE activity # 0204-0000-15-420-H04-T
1 hour (0.1 CEU)

Diversity is growing in workforces across the country. Members of working teams differ not only by gender, race, and ethnic background, but also by age and generation. In personal communication, relationships, and professional settings it is common for two people to disconnect based on the preconception that others do or should communicate in the same manner. Team members need to adapt to a wide variety of demographic differences and learning styles. When connecting with others, establishing similarities and recognizing differences are keys to success. This program will outline common generational differences and leadership styles. Participants will learn how to be effective communicators by adapting and communicating in ways coworkers and leaders understand.

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this knowledge-based educational activity, participants will be able to

  • Describe the dynamics of a multigenerational workforce.
  • Differentiate common leadership styles used in pharmacy work environments.
  • Apply principles of generational differences to real-life pharmacy scenarios.
  • Podcast
  • On-Demand
  • CE Monograph
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Understanding Substance Abuse

Johnny Moore, R.Ph.
Pharmacy District Manager
Sears Holdings Corporation
Richmond, Virginia

ACPE activity #0204-0000-16-436-H01-T
1 hour (0.1 CEU)

Many pharmacy professionals are not adequately trained to deal with substance abuse, especially as it relates to identifying, intervening, or treating patients and coworkers with drug abuse problems.  Faculty will outline the services available for impaired health care practitioners. Common human resources procedures for addressing suspected or confirmed employee impairment due to substance abuse and/or addiction will also be described. Pharmacy technicians will also learn the signs and symptoms of impairment from substance abuse or addiction.

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this knowledge-based educational activity, participants will be able to

  • Describe diagnosis criteria for abuse and addiction.
  • List signs and symptoms of impairment due to substance abuse and/or addiction.
  • Outline services available for health care practitioners facing addiction.
  • Describe human resource procedures for addressing suspected or confirmed employee impairment due to substance abuse or addiction.
  • Podcast
  • On-Demand
  • CE Monograph
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Wheel of Pharmacy Technician Career Opportunities: How to Hit the Jackpot

Christine Manukyan, Pharm.D., MS
Outpatient Pharmacy Supervisor
Cedars-Sinai medical Center
Los Angeles, California

ACPE activity #0204-0000-16-456-H04-T
1 hour (0.1 CEU)

Pharmacy technicians are an integral part of the pharmacy team and assist pharmacists in tasks ranging from filling prescriptions, to compounding, and many more duties. This activity will highlight how the role of pharmacy technicians continues to evolve and the skills and training needed to keep up.

As the scope of practice differs from state to state and between practice environments, technicians must be well versed in meeting the needs of the pharmacy team and more importantly, meeting the needs of the patients in each setting. Faculty will highlight the impact of successful and innovative pharmacy technician roles in medication safety and compliance, transitions of care, automation, investigational drug service, and others.

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this knowledge-based continuing education activity, participants should be able to

  • Explain how pharmacy technician scope of practice and regulations vary amongst states
  • Identify resources for pharmacy technician education and training
  • Describe innovative roles of pharmacy technicians
  • Podcast
  • On-Demand
  • CE Monograph
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Quality Improvement

Medication Histories and Reconciliation

Stephanie Labonville, Pharm.D., BCPS
Clinical Pharmacy Specialist
Brigham and Women’s Hospital
Boston, Massachusetts

ACPE activity #0204-0000-16-433-H01-T
1 hour (0.1 CEU)

This activity will outline effective procedures for obtaining medication histories from patients and caregivers.  Faculty will review key aspects of a medication history, as well as how to identify signs of non-compliance when obtaining a medication history and how to resolve these issues with patients and providers.

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this knowledge-based educational activity, participants will be able to

  • Describe effective procedures for obtaining medication histories from patients and caregivers.
  • Describe the key aspects of a medication history and how to best obtain these pieces of information from patients.
  • List signs of non-compliance while taking a medication history and strategies for addressing non-compliance with the patient and the provider.
  • Podcast
  • On-Demand
  • CE Monograph
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Medication Therapy Management: Role of the Technician

Mary Ann Kliethermes, Pharm.D.
Vice Chair of Ambulatory Care
Associate Professor
Chicago College of Pharmacy
Midwestern University
Chicago, Illinois

ACPE activity #0204-0000-16-427-H01-T
1 hour (0.1 CEU)

This activity will review the rationale and benefits of medication therapy management (MTM) services.  Faculty will highlight the Medication Modernization Act and its role in advancing MTM, as well as the core elements and processes of MTM. Examples of MTM services will be described, including the role of the pharmacy technician in providing MTM services.  

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this knowledge-based educational activity, participants will be able to

  • Explain the need and value of medication therapy management (MTM) services.
  • Describe the Medicare Modernization Act and its role in advancing MTM.
  • Describe the core elements and process of MTM.
  • List the services that may encompass an MTM program.
  • Describe the role of the pharmacy technician in providing MTM services.
  • Podcast
  • On-Demand
  • CE Monograph
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Quality Management Overview

Patricia C. Kienle, R.Ph., MPA, FASHP
Director, Accreditation and Medication Safety
Cardinal Health
Laflin, Pennsylvania

Sylvia Q. Banzon, B.A., CPhT, CQIA, HACP, PMP, TFCSHP
Regional Data Quality Coordinator
Sutter Health
Sacramento, California

ACPE activity #0204-0000-13-433-H04-T
1 hour (0.1 CEU)

A pharmacist-pharmacy technician faculty team will provide a comprehensive overview of common quality control and quality improvement activities in pharmacy practice, including national quality and safety initiatives during this activity.  Process improvement methods and techniques such as Lean, Six Sigma, and Kaizan will be highlighted. Faculty will provide practical tips for identifying projects, as well as measuring and evaluating success.

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this knowledge-based educational activity, participants will be able to

  • Explain how quality control and quality improvement are used in pharmacy practice.
  • Describe process improvement methods and techniques, such as Lean.
  • Outline national quality and safety initiatives with relevance to pharmacy.
  • Podcast
  • On-Demand
  • CE Monograph
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Roles for Pharmacy Technicians in Transitions of Care

Binita Patel, Pharm.D., M.S.
Ambulatory/Retail Pharmacy Director
PGY1 Community Pharmacy Residency Director
Froedtert Health
Milwaukee, Wisconsin

ACPE activity #0204-0000-16-435-H01-T
1 hour (0.1 CEU)

This activity will highlight how pharmacy technicians can assist the patient care team in  transitions of care. Faculty will highlight the impact of successful transitions in care, including decreasing preventable hospital readmissions. The importance of obtaining accurate medication histories and patient billing information upon admission to facilitate transitions will also be described.

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this knowledge-based educational activity, participants will be able to

  • List points in the transitions of care process where pharmacy technicians can assist the patient care team.  
  • Explain the impact of decreasing preventable hospital readmissions.  
  • Explain the importance of obtaining accurate medication histories and patient billing information upon admission to facilitate transitions of care.
  • Podcast
  • On-Demand
  • CE Monograph
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Vaccines – Infectious Diseases

HIV Therapies: A Primer For Pharmacy Technicians

Douglas Slain, Pharm.D., BCPS, FCCP, FASHP
Associate Professor and Infectious Diseases Clinical Specialist
West Virginia University
Morgantown, West Virginia

ACPE #0204-0000-13-441-H02-T
1 hour (0.1 CEU)

Antiviral agents used to treat or prevent HIV infections (also known as antiretroviral agents) are complex agents that are frequently subject to prescribing and dispensing errors. Outside of infectious diseases specialists, the general medical and pharmacy community may not deal with these agents enough to optimize the use of these agents in patients with HIV infection. This educational initiative is designed to educate pharmacy technicians about antiretroviral medications used to treat and prevent HIV infection in any practice setting. Pharmacy technicians can help patients and pharmacists by knowing what formulations are available. They can also ensure diligence with any cautionary labels or interactions recommended during the dispensing process. Pharmacy technicians may also be asked to order, store, or compound antiretroviral agents that have unique stability or storage requirements. Pharmacy technicians working in hospitals or clinics should understand the importance of using antiretroviral agents for occupational HIV exposure amongst health care workers.

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this knowledge-based educational activity, participants will be able to

  • List antiretroviral agents that are available in combination products.
  • Describe ways to deliver antiretroviral therapy to patients who have difficulty swallowing oral medications.
  • Explain the general approach to using antiretroviral agents for occupational HIV exposure in health care workers.
  • Podcast
  • On-Demand
  • CE Monograph
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Immunizations from A to Z (ACIP to Zostavax)

Macary Weck Marciniak, Pharm.D., BCACP, BCPS, FAPhA
Clinical Associate Professor
UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Chapel Hill, North Carolina

ACPE activity # 0204-0000-14-710-H04-T
1 hour (0.1 CEU)

As the pharmacist’s role as an immunization provider has expanded nationwide, so too has the role of the pharmacy technician. Pharmacy technicians are key players in the “immunization neighborhood” and help to assure safe provision of vaccines in both community and health-system pharmacy settings. This program will serve as a primer for pharmacy technicians on immunizations – how they work, which vaccines are most likely to be seen in practice, and what you need to know to help patients receive the immunizations they need.

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this knowledge-based educational activity, participants will be able to

  • Explain differences between active and passive immunity and the various types of vaccines available on the market.
  • Define key terms in the “alphabet soup” of immunization-related acronyms.
  • Identify and describe vaccines routinely administered.
  • Discuss steps to ensure immunization safety in practice.
  • Podcast
  • On-Demand
  • CE Monograph
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Infection Prevention: What Every Healthcare Worker Needs to Know

Rebeccah J. Collins, Pharm.D., BCPS
Pharmacy Residency Director, Antimicrobial Stewardship Team Lead
Bon Secours Richmond Health System - Memorial Regional Medical Center
Mechanicsville, Virginia

ACPE activity # 0204-0000-15-415-H04-T
1 hour (0.1 CEU)

Infectious diseases, such as Ebola, have gained attention in the media and in politics, leading to great public concern. All healthcare facilities are required to put infection control and basic hygiene at the forefront of good clinical practice. All healthcare workers have a duty to care for their patients by preventing infections from spreading. This educational program will provide an overview of the key elements of infection control and prevention. Specific infection types and how they can be prevented will be reviewed.

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this knowledge-based educational activity, participants will be able to

  • Explain standard precautions and how they can be applied to any healthcare setting.
  • Describe the role of personal protection methods including contact and airborne precautions.
  • Describe what MRSA, Clostridium difficile, Ebola, and Norovirus are and understand their impact in healthcare.
  • Explain necessary precautions to prevent and control Health Care Associated Infections.
  • Podcast
  • On-Demand
  • CE Monograph
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Vaccines and Immunization Initiatives: The Role of the Pharmacy Technician

Michael D. Hogue, Pharm.D., FAPhA, FNAP
Interim Dean
Associate Professor and Chair
Department of Pharmacy Practice
McWhorter School of Pharmacy
Samford University
Birmingham, Alabama

ACPE Activity# 0204-0000-16-454-H04-T
1 hour (0.1 CEU)

Pharmacists have become primary providers for vaccines in many hospitals and community pharmacy practices. The role of the pharmacist in immunization programs and disease prevention has rapidly expanded. Pharmacy technicians have an equally important role to play in ensuring the safe preparation and dispensing of vaccines, as well as in assisting the pharmacist in identifying patients who may need to be immunized. This program will provide pharmacy technicians with practical strategies for active involvement in pharmacy-based immunization initiatives.

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this knowledge-based educational activity, participants will be able to

  • Identify common errors in preparation and dispensing of vaccines, as well as strategies for preventing these errors.
  • Assist the pharmacist in identifying patients in need of select adult immunizations.
  • Identify opportunities to engage pharmacists and patients in dialogue about common myths about vaccines.
  • On-Demand
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Live Webinar Live Webinar Live Webinar - Innovations in Training: Pharmacy Technician Residency Program
May 11, 2017
12-1 p.m. ET
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  • Podcasts can be played on-demand from your computer or downloaded to an MP3 player or mobile device for CE on the go.
  • Live Webinars provide synchronized slides and audio with the opportunity to ask live questions of the presenters.
  • On-Demand activities provide synchronized slides and audio in a format available any time.
  • CE Monographs digest the content of presentation into a publication format that can be printed or downloaded.
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